Betty Makoni received Afrikan Goddess award and then US Fundraising and Speaking Tour 8 to 18 June

Betty Makoni is on US tour in Washington DC, Los Angeles, Seattle and New York to receive an award, speak, fundraise and meet inspirational women and men, girls and boys to form networking forums to advance the rights of girls
The events will be updated daily.
Washington DC
Our story is shared and celebrated globally and we now have thirty prestigious awards to include the Afrikan Goddess award. Enjoy the pictures and enjoy our story as it is positioned globally to inspire many.

Afrikan Goddess awards ceremony in Washington DC, USA: 9 June

http://afrikangoddessawards.com/home/

Launching of Girl Child Network USA Chapter in Los Angeles

After some two years of hard work with young men and women in Los Angeles, they have finally registered GCN USA and it is an organisation they are strengthening now now. I am so delighted with this latest development as it means our efforts to mobilise support for girls is getting stronger by the day. I am doing everything possible to transition my leadership to GCN USA so that all fundraising projects initiated in USA are managed directly in the  country. The more we decentralise and build more networks the more the world helps girls more effectively and efficiently. Many hands make the work easier.

Below is news via their Facebook group page and announcement of their development. On 11 to 12 June I will be in Los Angeles training the youths as well as ensuring systems are in place to set up the Girls Empowerment and Education Fund.

Below is a press release from GCN USA

Welcome to the Girl Child Network United States. Still in its founding year, the GCNUSA is a developing organization in need of membership and filling out of various leadership positions. Our intention is to create a US based organization that can publicize and fundraise for the Girl Child Network Worldwide within the United States. According to our 5 year plan, we intend to have the capacity to fully fund numerous projects of the GCN in Zimbabwe and Africa. Our goal is to educate and empower the exploited youth in Zimbawe and provide them with the opportunity to grow in their respective communities. The organziation was jointly founded by Gabe Gilbert-Lurie, Ameek Shokar and Alec Eginli. If you have been added to this group then you were recommended by at least one of our board members or Betty Makoni to serve this organization in some capacity.

More than before we have various representatives in USA as follows and please contact them direct and be part of GCN USA. All donations are directly made to GCN USA:

Alec Egili- girlchildnetworkusa@gmail.com (Board of Directors: Los Angeles)

Nalinika Perera- gcnusa.ny@gmail.com (New York Representative)

Jolene Thomas- gcnw.washingtonstate@gmail.com (Washington Ambassador)

Please note website is still under construction

Making Real Change Fundraiser-Seattle
Co-charities being honored along side GCN are:
1) Queen, It’s a New Day
Ceo & Founder Judy Hoff will share the stage with you at some point during the event.
Here’s some information on her organization.
For over 10 years, thousands of abused, broken and forgotten women have been transformed from devastation to empowerment and self sufficiency.
2) SeeYourImpact.org
Their motto is “SeeYourImpact is a revolutionary way to help those in need around the world and next door. Give a gift. In about 2 weeks, we’ll tell you exactly who you helped and how.”
Juneteenth Event held in NYC SGI Culture center on June 16th
Juneteenth, also known as Freedom Day or Emancipation Day, is a holiday in the United States honoring African American heritage by commemorating the announcement of the abolition of slavery in the U.S. State of Texas in 1865. Texas, as a part of the Confederacy, was resistant to the Emancipation Proclamation, and though slavery was very prevalent in East Texas, it was not as common in the Western areas of Texas. Juneteenth commemorates June 18 and 19, 1865. June 18 is the day federal troops arrived in Texas, to take possession of the state and enforce the emancipation of its slaves. That day has since become known as Juneteenth, a name coming from a portmanteau of the words June and teenth like nineteenth and other numbers ending with -teenth.